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We are excited to let everyone know we will be participating in a blogging carnival this month about Environmental Education called Learning in the Great Outdoors.

According to the website, the carnival “is intended to be a monthly clearinghouse for online resources, discussions, tools, debate, or any other information related to using the environment as a context for learning.

If you are interested in nature and environmental education, take a look at the results from last month's May 2008 carnival hosted at the 10,000 Birds website. You might want to spend some time checking out the rest of this interesting site, too.

The June 2008 carnival will be held at The Miss Rumpius Effect blog, by a teacher educator who discusses poetry, children's literature and issues related to teaching children. Stop by her science resources for teachers, too.

We also want to thank Karen at Leaping From the Box for mentioning us in her blog. If you are interested in homeschooling, Karen's website, blog and chat are great resources.

Upon revisiting the same plants again and again while searching for the bug of the week, I've made an interesting discovery. Although we think of insects as being highly mobile, a few do settle down for a period of time and make a plant their home. For example, the tarantula hawk from last week is still around. It seems to be a male and it has staked out one of our milkweed plants as his very own. We've started calling him our "pet" tarantula hawk wasp.

Going back to where I found the assassin bug earlier, I was surprised to find this adult assassin bug. The adult looks very different from the bright orange nymph. It is green with dark red on its wings. Would you have recognized it? I wonder if it the same one...

assassin bug adult