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Pi Day is coming up next week on March 14 (3/14), chosen because the first three digits of pi are 3.14... It is a fun way to celebrate the mathematical constant π and all things math.

Pi is based on the relationship (ratio) between circumference of a circle and its diameter. If you're a bit rusty in math, the diameter is a straight line segment that passes through the center of a circle and has endpoints on the circle. The circumference is the distance around the outside of the circle.

Public domain image by Kjoonlee, based on previous work by w:User:Papeschr at  Wikimedia

Pi was first established as the ratio of the circumference to the diameter.

π = C/d

It is a fascinating number because it is so useful, but it is also irrational. That means it is an infinite, non-repeating decimal.

Pi Day activities can run the gamut from serious to seriously lighthearted.

Public domain image of a Pi Day pie

You might want to check out

One great way to celebrate Pi Day is to read a book about math. We maintain a list of children's math books for Pi Day and every day at Science Books for Kids. Let's add some recent releases to the list:

Goodnight, Numbers by Danica McKellar and illustrated by Alicia Padron is for children who are learning their numbers.

Danica McKellar is not just another celebrity using their fame to hawk children's books. She is a serious mathematician whose goal is to get kids excited about math through books and videos. Her first books were for middle and high school aged kids. Now she's writing for the youngest set.

You can see what she has to say in this book trailer:

Age Range: 2 - 5 years
Publisher: Crown Books for Young Readers (March 7, 2017)
ISBN-10: 110193378X
ISBN-13: 978-1101933787

STEAM stands for science, technology, engineering, art, and math.  This is Not Another Math Book by Anna Weltman and ilustrated by‎ Charlotte Milner is a perfect choice for older kids who want to explore art as a way to understand math.

Author Anna Weltman has created an imaginative series of hands-on projects that include exploring symmetry by drawing kaleidoscopic patterns, growing a forest of fractal trees, and assembling five-square pentomino shapes into pictures.

Ages: 9+
Paperback: 96 pages
Publisher: Kane Miller Books / EDC Publishing; First American edition (2018)
ISBN-10: 1610675975
ISBN-13: 978-1610675970

For the full list, see children's math books for Pi Day and every day at Science Books for Kids.

list-math-books-for-pi-day

With the advent of the Global Positioning System (GPS ), people of all ages are forgetting how to use or create maps. This is an issue because maps aren't just for finding our way to Grandma's house. Not only are they useful for organizing information visually, but they are also a relevant way to develop the spatial relations skills that are so useful in many careers.

We often underestimate the ability of young children to learn how to read and understand maps. That's why a resource like the new nonfiction picture book Mapping My Day by Julie Dillemuth and illustrated by Laura Wood is such an asset for educators.

Mapping My Day introduces basic map concepts and vocabulary through a day in the life of a young girl named Flora. She wakes up to a lesson about cardinal directions, races to the bathroom while learning about map scale, and goes outside to use a treasure map full of landmarks. And that's all before breakfast.

The back matter includes a "Note to Parents, Caregivers, and Professionals" with explanations of why mapping skills are so important and an extensive section explaining map concepts with suggestions for numerous activities. Activity pages to encourage children to try out their mapping skills are included.

Mapping My Day explores an important topic that is often ignored. Educators will find it to be a valuable resource.

Related:

  1. Download the activity pages from the back matter for free at the Magination Press website (publishing arm of the American Psychological Association)
  2. Learn NC has an extensive discussion about Map skills and higher-order thinking for educators
  3. Read a book and do an activity for Pi Day from a previous post at Growing with Science

Pi Day is coming up on Tuesday March 14 (3/14). It's a fun way to celebrate the mathematical constant π and all things math.

What does mapping have to do with math and Pi Day? Although often associated with geography, mapping is a way to present visual information that is useful in many STEM fields. Think of genome maps for genetics. Or, how about all the coordinates you learn about in geometry? Mapping is everywhere.

Explore more children's math books for Pi Day and every day at Science Books for Kids.

list-math-books-for-pi-day

Age Range: 4 - 8 years
Publisher: Magination Press; 1 edition (March 13, 2017)
ISBN-10: 1433823330
ISBN-13: 978-1433823336

Disclosure: This book was provided by the publisher for review purposes. Also, I am an affiliate with Amazon so I can provide you with cover images and links to more information about books and products. As you probably are aware, if you click through the highlighted title link and purchase a product, I will receive a very small commission, at no extra cost to you. Any proceeds help defray the costs of hosting and maintaining this website.

Come visit the STEM Friday blog each week to find more great Science, Technology, Engineering and Math books.

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Looking for a way to keep teenagers engaged in STEM?  Chaos Theory Uncovered: How chaos and fractals shape our world by E L Strauss might be just the ticket. It reveals how math can be used to help us understand and make predictions about large, complex events in a beautiful way.

When you first open the book the computer-generated illustrations might just give you chills, particularly the swirling brightly-colored lines against a black background that are visual representations of chaos. The images of fractals are stunning as well, particularly the Mandelbrot set. Magic happens when art meets math.

green-patterned-fractal(Public domain illustration of a fractal From PublicDomainPictures.net)

At the beginning of the text, Strauss helps the reader tiptoe into the topic by starting out with the history of how chaos theory came into being. In this case it started when a meteorologist noticed a problem when he ran simulations on a computer and delved into why the anomaly happened. He eventually proposed a model to explain it that would lead to the so-called "butterfly effect" and the foundations of chaos theory.

The concepts that follow build on each other each other in a logical progression that increases the reader's understanding while keeping him or her engaged. The clear organization makes the text easy to follow even though the vocabulary is challenging.

The best part about the book is it is not watered down for kids. To get the most out of it, the reader should probably have a working understanding of at least algebra, and an inkling of beginning calculus would be helpful.

Chaos Theory Uncovered: How Chaos and Fractals Shape Our World is sure to help young adults and adults to understand complex math. It might also help some to discover an astonishing new passion. Create your own butterfly effect by picking up a copy today.

Note:  Our book today is in the same series as last week's young adult book about the universe.

Related Activity:

Vi Hart is the queen of combining math and art, and in this case to study plant structures. Her Doodling in Math: Spirals, Fibonacci, and Being a Plant is a 3-part series, starting with the following video. Hope it inspires you to try some similar projects.

Rest of series:
Video 2
Video 3

Paperback: 110 pages
Publisher: Thinxygen (November 6, 2015)
ISBN-10: 0620683546
ISBN-13: 978-0620683548

Interested in finding more math books for kids? Try our growing list at Science Books for Kids.

math-books-for-kids

Disclosure:  A .pdf was provided by the author for review purposes. Also, I am an affiliate with Amazon so I can provide you with cover images and links to more information about books and products. As you probably are aware, if you click through the highlighted title link and purchase a product, I will receive a very small commission, at no extra cost to you. Any proceeds help defray the costs of hosting and maintaining this website.

Come visit the STEM Friday blog each week to find more great Science, Technology, Engineering and Math books.