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It's that time to reflect on the past year by choosing some of our favorite insect photographs.

Seems like most of our favorite photos told a story. For example, the bee visiting a flower was in danger. Can you see why?

That brown bit in the upper right side is a jumping spider looking for prey. The bee did manage to get away.

Another fun story was a friend sharing some silkworm larvae.

We watched them grow,

spin cocoons,

and emerge as adult moths. The experience inspired another story in the form of a children's book. We'll see what happens to that in 2018.

We loved watching these wood ants tend to their herd of aster hoppers. (See more at Wild About Ants).

Let's not forget this Asian multicolored lady beetle, which reminds us lady beetles eat pollen as well as aphids.

We followed a grasshopper in a sunflower.

Then we discovered an adult queen butterfly next to a monarch butterfly caterpillar.

We wish to thank all our friends and family who took these journeys with us and helped make the stories happen. You're the best!

This week a friend of mine asked me if I'd like some silkworms. She knew I was an experienced silkworm mom and she had received way too many from her order in the mail.

So, now we have tiny silkworm caterpillars to feed.

They are so adorable, how could I say no?

(See our previous posts about the silkworm life cycle and the history of silkworms.)

While picking leaves in the yard this morning for the silkworms, I found this giant swallowtail butterfly.

It's pretty bedraggled. What do you think happened to it?

 

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Awhile back, I showed you the life stages of the silkworm moth. I missed one stage, however, so here they are:

silkworm-eggs

silkworm-eggs2

Silkworm moth eggs.

In case you are wondering, the female moth in the top photograph laid her eggs on a paper towel. The female in the bottom photograph laid on a cardboard egg carton.