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For STEM Friday and National Poetry Month we have a new children's book,  A Rocketful of Space Poems chosen by John Foster and illustrated by Korky Paul.


The collection includes poems from the likes of J. Patrick Lewis, Eric Finney, and Judith Nicholls. Many of the poems are not particularly serious, since they are about monsters, witches, magicians and aliens. They allow the reader to "fly into space, drive to the moon, meet an asteroid dog and a flurb blurp, and then play intergalactic Squibble-Ball." As you can see, the featured poems are highly imaginative but have a science-based foundation underneath. For example:

Space Riddle by John Foster

I used to be a Planet
But I'd a terribLe shock
When they annoUnced
That I was nothing buT
a large lump of rOck.

Korky Paul's illustrations are wacky and delightful. Each two-page spread has a frame around it filled with fun things to discover.

Pick up A Rocketful of Space Poems today and share a few with young readers for National Poetry Month. Let their imaginations soar!

Related activity ideas:

 

You might also want to try our related lists at Science Books for Kids:

Age Range: 7 - 10 years
Publisher: Frances Lincoln Children's Bks (February 15, 2017)
ISBN-10: 1847804861
ISBN-13: 978-1847804860

Disclosure: This book was provided by the publisher for review purposes. Also, I am an affiliate with Amazon so I can provide you with cover images and links to more information about books and products. As you probably are aware, if you click through the highlighted title link and purchase a product, I will receive a very small commission, at no extra cost to you. Any proceeds help defray the costs of hosting and maintaining this website.

Come visit the STEM Friday blog each week to find more great Science, Technology, Engineering and Math books.

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Sue Fliess's newest picture book, The Bug Book, starts with text that really reflects the best way to teach science to kids:

"Grab a bucket. Check your guide.
Let's go find some bugs outside!

As you can see from the quote, the text is written in lively rhyming verse. The illustrations are bright, colorful photographs from stock sources. See our full review at our sister blog, Wrapped in Foil.

You can also check out the official trailer:

Insect Poetry Activity:

  1. Download/print some colorful bug photographs.

buckeye-butterfly-dbg-4(Feel free to use images from our Bug of the Week category for this educational project).

2. Encourage children to write their own insect poems inspired by the photographs. Younger children can create descriptive word lists. Acrostic poems (spelling a word with the first letters of each line) can give hesitant poets a comfortable structure to get them stated.

Active
Numerous
Tiny
Soldiers

3. Gather the poems into a small book or display them on a wall.

Related:

Check out our recent series of insect science lessons for kids.

Insect Science Investigations

See our growing list of children's poetry books with an insect theme.

poetry-books-about-insects-for-children

Age Range: 3 - 5 years
Publisher: Grosset & Dunlap (February 23, 2016)
ISBN-10: 044848935X
ISBN-13: 978-0448489353

Disclosure: This book was provided by the publisher for review purposes. Also, I am an affiliate with Amazon so I can provide you with cover images and links to more information about books and products. As you probably are aware, if you click through the highlighted title or cover links and purchase a product, I will receive a very small commission, at no extra cost to you. Any proceeds help defray the costs of hosting and maintaining this website.

Looking for more children’s nonfiction books? Try the Nonfiction Monday blog.

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Today we have a new resource for sharing science poems with children.

Science poems? Yes, like "Comet Hunter" by Holly Thompson, which she reads in this video:
 

 

The resource is The Poetry Friday Anthology for Science (Teacher's Edition): Poems for the School Year Integrating Science, Reading, and Language Arts by Sylvia Vardell and Janet Wong.

 

The K-5 Teacher Edition has a poem for each week of a school year (36 weeks) for Kindergarten through 5th grade, for a total of 218 science poems by 78 poets. To help extend the poems, every one is accompanied by a 5-step mini-lesson with connections to the new Next Generation Science Standards.

student-editions

Separate student editions are also available for each grade that have 36 poems (plus a few bonus poems), each on a separate page and illustrated with line drawings.

Why combine poetry with science? As the authors suggest, a poem can be read and enjoyed by children with a range of reading abilities. The use of sensory language and vivid imagery is likely to bring a new depth to scientific concepts. Also, poems that are read aloud and savored can make science topics more memorable.

One benefit that the authors don't mention is that children who regularly hear poetry on different topics just might be inspired to write poetry of their own. I know I was:

Milkweed Beetle
By Roberta Gibson

Gently touch a milkweed beetle,
And it will give a squeak.
Bet you didn’t know an insect
So very small could speak.

All in all, The Poetry Friday Anthology for Science makes sharing science poems on a regular basis throughout the year a breeze. Aren't you ready to see where that could take your children?

Paperback: 308 pages
Publisher: Pomelo Books (February 28, 2014)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1937057976
ISBN-13: 978-1937057978

Do you write poetry for children or interested in reading more? Poetry Friday is an ongoing blogging digest by a group who share their poetry on Fridays. You can find a list of upcoming roundups and archives of past years at the Kidlitosphere Central website.

Disclosures: This book was provided for review by the publisher. Also, I am an affiliate for Amazon, and if you click through the linked titles or ads and make a purchase, I will receive a small commission at no extra charge to you. Proceeds will be used to maintain this self-hosted blog.

If you are interested in children's nonfiction, you might want to visit the Nonfiction Monday blog and see what other new books bloggers have found.

nonfictionmonday