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Today we are participating in a blog tour for the fabulous new picture book biography The Leaf Detective: How Margaret Lowman Uncovered Secrets in the Rainforest by Heather Lang and illustrated by Jana Christy. I'm so excited about this book, I'm offering a giveaway via Rafflecopter below.

If you are familiar at all with rainforest biology, you know that the forests are structured into layers.

The Leaf Detective book is as multilayered as a rainforest.

The trunk of the book is the biography of Margaret Lowman, an incredibly brave and determined biologist who developed new methods for studying the tops of trees, the canopy and emergent layers. Using ropes and a harness of her own design, she climbed up into the great unknown.

We had already been to the moon and back and nobody had been to the top of a tree.

The branches of the story are Meg Lowman's findings. For example, she discovered that most of the herbivores in the rainforest she studied were nocturnal, eating leaves at night and hiding during the day. To learn more, she climbed up into the trees at night.

The roots of the story comes after Meg realized that for all people didn't know about trees, they were still destroying them at an alarming rate. She started to come up with innovative ways for people to use intact forests as a source of income and thus making it economically viable to save them.

Let's not forget the leaves. Sprinkled throughout are leaf-shaped sidebars filled with interesting facts and additional details. So cool!

The illustrations are as green and lush and complex as a rainforest, too. The reader could get lost and spend hours in them. My favorite shows Meg sitting in her office, but the wall has disappeared and has become part of the natural world outside. It emphasizes that we aren't separate from the natural world, but we are part of it.

The bottom line? The Leaf Detective is perfect for young readers who are budding scientists, adventurers, conservationists, interested in women's history, the list goes on and on. Pretty much everyone will find something to explore in it. Pick up a copy and see how it resonates with you.

Activity Suggestions to Accompany the Book:

1. Investigate Leaf Age

One way Meg Lowman studied trees was to investigate leaf ages.

In areas where trees lose all their leaves in the fall, leaf age isn't a big question. However, some trees may be evergreen, or in warm climates may keep their leaves year around.

If you’d like to find out how long the leaves live on trees or shrubs in your neighborhood, choose some freshly emerged leaves and mark them with an acrylic marker. The young leaves are a lighter, brighter green color and are often softer in texture.

If you don't have a marker, you could also mark the leaves with tags or ties, anything that won’t wear or fall off or interfere with normal leaf development and photosynthesis. Record how many leaves you tag, when you tag them, and roughly where they are in the tree.

Check your leaves periodically. You might want to mark more leaves each time if you see new, fresh ones. This is a long-term project, so be patient.

We marked some of the new leaves on our lemon tree, which is evergreen here, a few years ago. Our marked leaves remained on the tree through one entire year. The tree dropped a lot of leaves a couple of times, but our marked ones held on. Unfortunately, our marked leaves were lost before the experiment was finished when someone -- who didn't know about our experiment -- trimmed the tree.

Let us know what kind of tree or shrub you choose and how long the leaves last.

2. Be a Fallen Leaf Detective

If you live in an area where the leaves come off in the fall, you can do a lot of leaf investigations. For example, you can figure out which leaves came from which trees.

Gather a good tree identification guide that shows both leaf shape and bark patterns. Identify the leaf by its shape, then find the tree by its bark pattern, color, and general shape.

Start with some trees you know well to practice then move on to unknowns. Remember that leaves blow around. Look for nuts/seeds to match with the trees that produced them, as well. Treat it like a game.

During a quiet moment, take a good look at the trees. Once the trees have lost their leaves, other aspects of their structure are revealed, such as the texture of the bark, the shape of the branches, even the leaf scars on the twigs. Compare different trees. Close your eyes and feel the bark. Listen. Smell the wood. Do trees smell differently? Talk about your findings.

Related:

 

Reading age : 7 - 10 years
Publisher : Calkins Creek; Illustrated edition (February 9, 2021)
ISBN-10 : 1684371775
ISBN-13 : 978-1684371778

Disclosure: This book was provided electronically for review purposes. Also, I am an affiliate with Amazon so I can provide you with cover images and links to more information about books and products. As you probably are aware, if you click through the highlighted title link and purchase a product, I will receive a very small commission, at no extra cost to you. Any proceeds help defray the costs of hosting and maintaining this website.

See more about the book in this trailer.

Check out the other stops on the blog tour for interviews with the author, activity suggestions, and giveaways ending soon at Mrs. Knott's Book Nook and Unleashing Readers!

The Giveaway

Please let me know if you have any difficulty entering.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

We're also participating in:

Come visit the STEM Friday blog each week to find more great Science, Technology, Engineering and Math books.

Looking for an enjoyable and relaxing way to put the A in STEAM? Check out the Bay Ridge Coloring Book: Botanical Treasures from the Neighborhood and Narrows Botanical Gardens Coloring Book, both by Kristin Reiber Harris.

Each book features 30 illustrations, the vast majority of which are botanically-accurate plants. Each illustration is accompanied by the name of the plant --or in a few cases, other finds in the garden -- with a few lines about it. For example, hollyhocks are accompanied with a personal recollection of the author's experience with hollyhocks as a child. You can see more of the illustrations at Kristin Reiber Harris's portfolio website.

Coloring and other forms of artistic expression develop abilities that are useful in many careers, such as fine motor and close observation skills. Plus, it can be relaxing in an era when we all need less stress.

Explore these beautiful coloring books and see how they will inspire you.

Related activity:

Investigate the featured plants you choose to color. For example, discover where the plant grows and what its identifying characteristics are. Come up with your own paragraph to accompany your art, which can be personal or factual or both.

Fun facts about hollyhocks:

  1. Hollyhocks are commonly biennial. The first year they grow as a low cluster of leaves. The second year a stalk shoots up and they flower.
  2. The flower stalks can be four to eight feet tall.
  3. Hollyhocks are originally from Europe and Asia.

 

ASIN : B08K41XS49
Language : English
Paperback : 65 pages
ISBN-13 : 979-8679916388

 

ASIN : B08NX4Y41C
Publisher : Independently published (November 23, 2020)
Paperback : 65 pages
ISBN-13 : 979-8563424869

 

Disclosure: These books were provided by the author for review purposes. Also, I am an affiliate with Amazon so I can provide you with cover images and links to more information about books and products. As you probably are aware, if you click through the highlighted title link and purchase a product, I will receive a very small commission at no extra cost to you. Any proceeds help defray the costs of hosting and maintaining this website.

Just in time for fall we have the new picture book, Summer Green to Autumn Gold: Uncovering Leaves' Hidden Colors by Mia Posada.

 

Have you ever wondered how and why leaves of certain trees change color in the fall? This book gives the answers. Mia Posada combines gorgeous --gorgeous! -- cut paper collage and watercolor illustrations with a succinct explanation of the science behind all those brilliant colors.

The author starts with green summer leaves of a range of shades from a wide variety of trees, from aspen and ash to white oak and willow. The leaves are labelled and accurate enough that they could be real leaves pressed. She then explains that the green pigment is chlorophyll and what is used for. She doesn't name the other pigments found in leaves in the main text, but discusses them extensively in the back matter.

In addition to describing what happens to the leaves in autumn, she also follows the trees through winter to spring when new green leaves emerge again.

The extensive back matter includes a glossary and links to hands-on experiments.

Summer Green to Autumn Gold is a perfect combination that will appeal to both budding artists and scientists. Leaf through a copy today!

Related Activity Suggestions:

To see different pigments found in green leaves, try our chromatography activity post.

Want to read more? Visit our growing list of children's books abut autumn science at Science Books for Kids.

Age Range: 5 - 10 years
Publisher: Millbrook Press TM (August 6, 2019)
ISBN-10: 1541528999
ISBN-13: 978-1541528994

Disclosure: This book was provided by our local library. Also, I am an affiliate with Amazon so I can provide you with cover images and links to more information about books and products. As you probably are aware, if you click through the highlighted title link and purchase a product, I will receive a very small commission, at no extra cost to you. Any proceeds help defray the costs of hosting and maintaining this website.

Come visit the STEM Friday blog each week to find more great Science, Technology, Engineering and Math books.