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Although even though they may have lost their leaves where you live, now is a great time to learn about trees. You can get started with the exciting new middle grade title Can You Hear the Trees Talking?: Discovering the Hidden Life of the Forest by Peter Wohlleben.

Peter Wohlleben is the well-known author of the bestselling popular science book for adults, The Hidden Life of Trees.  Now he's applied his eye-opening approach to understanding trees in this book for young readers. He asks kid-friendly questions, such as "How do trees drink?" and answers them using current scientific knowledge and appropriate vocabulary. Even if you already know a lot about trees, be prepared to say, "Wow!"

Let's look at one example. Wohlleben asks, "What do tree children learn at school?" Wait, trees go to school? What is that about? Turns out that in mature forests young saplings spend a lot of time being nourished and shaped by their mother tree and other mature trees nearby. Isn't that a cool idea?

Each question is answered on a two-page spread with gorgeous color photographs. Many of the spreads have activity suggestions, labelled "Try This!" I counted 18 hands-on activities. There are also many sidebars with extra cool facts and some quick quizzes to reinforce learning. You could spend months going through this book.

Can You Hear the Trees Talking? is a must-have resource that is likely to awe and inspire readers, young and old. Seriously!

Suggested Activity:

Go outside and look at some trees. Examine them closely. Smell them. Feel them. Listen to them. Just experiencing a tree is sure to generate questions and inspire creativity.

More Tree Science Activity Suggestions (From This Blog):

    1. Tree Transpiration
    2. How far does the water have to travel from roots to top of the tree?

Want to find more great books like this one? Visit our giant, redwood-sized list of tree books for kids.

Age Range: 8 - 10 years
Publisher: Greystone Kids; Reprint edition (October 1, 2019)
ISBN-10: 1771644346
ISBN-13: 978-1771644341

Disclosure: This book was provided for review purposes. Also, I am an affiliate with Amazon so I can provide you with cover images and links to more information about books and products. As you probably are aware, if you click through the highlighted title link and purchase a product, I will receive a very small commission, at no extra cost to you. Any proceeds help defray the costs of hosting and maintaining this website.

Come visit the STEM Friday blog each week to find more great Science, Technology, Engineering and Math books. Note: this is a new link as of 10/2018.

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For moth week I have definitely saved the best for last with Jerry Pallotta's new Not a Butterfly Alphabet Book: It's About Time Moths Had Their Own Book!, illustrated by Shennen Bersani.

Our family love Jerry Pallotta's nonfiction alphabet books. They are wryly humorous (as you can tell from the title) and full of quirky facts. That's why we were thrilled to get our hands on this new one.

Don't let the name "alphabet book" dissuade you. These are serious nonfiction books that use the alphabet as a way to organize information. This one highlights 26 different species of moths, from the giant Atlas moth to the gorgeous zigzag moth (you'll see immediately how it got it's name). Along the way readers learn about aspects of moth biology, such as facts about their mouthparts, wing scales, and life cycles.

Shennen Bersani's amazing illustrations explode the myth that moths are drab or boring. You are likely to say, "Wow!" with every page turn. They are gorgeous. Seriously!

Not a Butterfly Alphabet Book will thrill budding entomologists and artists alike. Pick up a copy and find out why moths deserve their day in the sun.

Activity Suggestion:  Make your own moth alphabet book.

Gather images, take photographs, or make drawings of 26 moths with names that start with the letters from a to z. For younger children, you might want to start with the free coloring pages at the National Moth Week website. Research facts about each species and write a paragraph or two for each different kind. Assemble the pages into a book to read again and again.

There are many online tutorials on how to draw different moths. Here is a simple one to get you started.

 

See the moth images in our previous posts about an insect alphabet, which is split into A-M and N-Z.

Age Range: 3 - 7 years
Publisher: Charlesbridge (November 5, 2019)
ISBN-10: 1580896898
ISBN-13: 978-1580896894

Thank you for participating in Moth and Butterfly Week. Related posts:

Disclosure: This book was provided by the publisher for review purposes. Also, I am an affiliate with Amazon so I can provide you with cover images and links to more information about books and products. As you probably are aware, if you click through the highlighted title link and purchase a product, I will receive a very small commission, at no extra cost to you. Any proceeds help defray the costs of hosting and maintaining this website.

Come visit the STEM Friday blog each week to find more great Science, Technology, Engineering and Math books. Note: this is a new link as of 10/2018.

It is common to find caterpillars in Arizona this time of year, but during a recent trip to Pennsylvania and New York State I was surprised to find both moth and butterfly caterpillars active in late October.

My sister still had lovely kale plants in her garden, as well as a caterpillar or two.

These are the larvae of the cabbage white butterfly, Pieris rapae.

The butterflies were also flitting about. My sister didn't need to worry about this one, though. It is a male. I can tell because it has a single dot of black in the middle of each forewing. The females have two dots.

 

It isn't quite so unusual to see goldenrod in bloom.

If you know where to look, you can also see a caterpillar.

If if it finishes developing in time, this caterpillar will likely become a moth.

Want to learn more? Try some of our Moth Blog Posts at Growing With Science:

 

Perhaps I should have named it caterpillar week!

Related posts for Moth Week: