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What's happening in the garden today?

The cilantro plants are flowering.

Some people might say the plants are finished and pull them out.

On the other hand, there are several reasons to leave them be.

First of all, cilantro has lovely lacy white flowers. It is a pretty plant.

cilantro seeds
Plus, if you let the plant mature, it will produce seeds that you can save for next year or share with fellow gardeners.

An additional benefit is that the flowers are food for pollinators, like this honey bee.

Or this flower fly.

Pollinators are important to help many different food and wild plants produce seeds. Allowing a few plants to make flowers can help them survive.

Beauty, seeds, pollinators. Letting cilantro go to seed is win-win.

Have you ever grown cilantro? Do you let it go to flower/set seeds? 

Interested in learning more about how to attract and help preserve pollinators? Check out:

 

 

In another in our series of STEM story times, let's explore insect-themed books, learning centers, and activities.

First I read Waiting for Wings by Lois Ehlert.

The children had a blast looking for insects in the illustrations. They were fully engaged in the story.

Check out our growing list of butterfly and moth books for more options.

After reading and discussing, they visited the STEM Stations.

STEM Activity Station 1. Insect Versus Not Insect

Prepare a sign or explain:

Insects have three body parts, six legs, and two antennae.

Gather:

  • plastic insect models
  • plastic spiders, scorpions, centipedes etc.  (often cheap and available at party stores around Halloween)

Have the children sort insect from non-insect.

Also presented live earthworms, sowbugs, and snails.

The living animals were a huge hit.

The rest of the stations I arranged roughly by insect order (groups).

STEM Activity Station 2. Chirp like a Cricket

Gather:

      • Craft sticks
      • Small plastic combs
      • Eric Carle's The Very Quiet Cricket board book (version that chirps when last page is opened)
      • Photographs of crickets
      • Cricket life cycle image (optional)

Crickets chirp by rubbing their wings together. Rub a craft stick across the comb to make a sound.

Although I didn't get any for this day, live crickets are available in many pet supply stores. They are easy to care for (see previous post).

STEM Activity Station 3:  Lady Beetles

Gather:

  • Lady beetle photographs and/or models
  • Lady beetle anatomy diagram (available in previous post).
  • Photographs of aphids
  • Diagrams of lady beetle life cycles
  • Model of lady beetle life cycle (optional)

STEM Activity Station 4:  Ants, Bees and Wasps

Gather:

  • Photographs and illustrations of ants, bees, and wasps
  • Board books
  • Models of honey bee comb
  • Ant life cycle diagram (Ask a Biologist)
  • Honey bee life stages diagrams

STEM Activity Station 5:  Cicadas

Gather:

  • Cicada exoskeletons (collect and save during summer)
  • Cicada models
  • Cicada life cycle diagram (Super Coloring has an amazing assortment of realistic life cycle diagrams)
  • Clicker to replicate cicada buzzing

STEM Activity Station 6:  Butterfly and moth life cycles

Gather:

  • Butterfly life cycle models and illustrations
  • Silkworm cocoons (raised previously and saved)
  • Silkworm eggs (raised previously and saved)
  • Silkworm life cycle diagrams (also from Super Coloring)

 

Also provided assorted crafts and crayon-rubbing templates.

Note:  At this age the templates slid around too much. Consider taping them down with painter's tape to help hold in place.

Also, fingerprint insects are fun, but I didn't have any washable ink stamp pads at home. Need to pick up some for next time.

We finished with We Dig Worms by Kevin McCloskey, which is what the children chose.

Soon they were counting all the earthworms on each page. It was a great way to end the class.

Visit our Pinterest Board for more insect science activity and craft ideas.

pin code insect activities

Even though we're well into the new year, here are a few photo favorites from 2019. By the way, none of these photographs have been edited.

Honey bee flying with loaded pollen baskets (legs)

Butterflies love zinnias.

Dragonfly perching.

Flower fly on a brittlebush flower

Cabbage butterfly caterpillar

Queen butterfly chrysalis

 

Web on a leaf

Let's end with another honey bee.

Happy New Year!