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For those interested in butterfly gardening and caterpillars, here are a few more children’s books to consider.

2015 Edit:  For our most complete and up-to-date list of butterfly books for kids, visit  Science Books for Kids website.

moth-and-butterfly-books-for-children-list

Nonfiction

Nic Bishop Butterflies and Moths by Nic Bishop just came out and it is fabulous!

The butterfly book : a kid's guide to attracting, raising, and keeping butterflies by Kersten Hamilton.

This butterfly book for older children is full of scientific information and suggestions for activities, such as making a butterfly net. It starts out with a “getting to know” section that covers much of the complex vocabulary children will need to read this and other books about butterflies. Then the author covers many aspects of raising and keeping butterflies, as well as butterfly behavior and biology. A butterfly guide on the edges of each page has extensive photographs and accurate illustrations of common butterflies, and includes a map of where they are found. The resource guide and “glossarized index” at the end help children find out more. If you are interested in raising butterflies or butterfly gardening, this book is an excellent resource.

It's a butterfly's life by Irene Kelly.

This nonfiction book has many lovely illustrations. If you are looking for a book for a child to read, be aware that the font looks like hand lettering and the sentences wave up and down across the page, almost like the pattern of a butterfly flying. This looks lovely, but may be hard for a beginning reader to read. It has many interesting facts, and covers the butterfly life cycle in detail.

Creepy, crawly caterpillars by Margery Facklam and illustrated by Paul Facklam.

All the terms used throughout the book are defined in the text in the first two pages. The second page of this book has an absolutely amazing illustration of a caterpillar with all its parts labeled clearly and accurately. The rest of the book is two-page spreads of specific common and interesting caterpillars, for example the woolly bear and the cecropia moth caterpillar. Most of the caterpillars chosen are actually moth caterpillars, rather than butterfly caterpillars, but it is still fascinating to learn about them. This book has a glossary.

Face to face with caterpillars by Darlyne A. Murawski.

The author is a photographer who talks about how she got some of her stunning photographs next to the actual results. She starts out with the story of a caterpillar that eats ants and how she photographed the caterpillar through glass. This and some other parts of the book feels as if the photographs drove the text, rather than vice versa. There is a great deal of information on caterpillars, however, to accompany the wonderful, one-of-a-kind photographs. The end contains a glossary: a “find out more” section with articles, books and websites; an index to help children search the text; and a sidebar of research and photographic notes.

Fiction

The girl who loved caterpillars : a twelfth-century tale from Japan adapted by Jean Merrill and illustrated by Floyd Cooper.

It is hard not to love a book that is so beautifully written and illustrated. The overall tale is of a lovely young Japanese girl who defies the traditions of her time. She prefers caterpillars and centipedes to butterflies, and collects and raises them. This story is incredibly complex, and even makes adults who read it think deeply about it. One issue is the fact that the story is probably only the first chapter of a much longer tale, but the rest has been lost. Some people may wonder why the author didn’t construct her own ending. Rather than detracting from the book however, for me it only made it more interesting.

There are more butterfly book reviews at the end of the white-lined sphinx moth post.

5

Wow, talk about timing. Shortly after I posted my Bug of the Week yesterday suggesting white-lined sphinx moth caterpillars (Hyles lineata) might be coming soon (see after second ladybug in that post), I got a call that masses of caterpillars are crossing Maricopa Road just South of Riggs Road, near Maricopa, Arizona. I drove right down. I probably should have taken the video camera instead of my still camera, because it doesn’t do justice to how fast these caterpillars were moving.

Unlike the pictures I linked to yesterday, these are mostly yellow and black caterpillars with a greenish head. As with many sphinx moths, the caterpillars have a spike at the tail.

whiteline caterpillar

The yellow marks below are where caterpillars didn’t make it across the road. I hope you can make out the yellow squiggles of all the caterpillars that are trying.

caterpillars in road

White-lined sphinx moth caterpillars vary considerably in color. This one was pale green rather than bright yellow.

small whiteline caterpillar

Aren’t these beauties?

caterpillar close upwhiteline caterpillar

Check the More About post for an update on white-lined sphinx moths.
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    Books About Caterpillars

If all these recent posts about caterpillars have made you interested in butterflies and moths, here are some books where you can learn more.

Books about caterpillars/butterflies for the youngest bug enthusiasts (Toddler):

The Very Hungry Caterpillar by Eric Carle
Summary: The board book version of this story is a perennial favorite. The story line is fun, the illustrations are colorful and the holes in the pages are magnets for little fingers. We made stick puppet characters and performed the story again and again.


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In depth review: As a scientist, I do have to point out one minor misuse of a term. In the end of the book (do I need to say spoiler alert here?) the caterpillar turns into a cocoon and then into a beautiful butterfly. Technically, however, a butterfly comes from chrysalis (or chrysalid), not a cocoon. Cocoons are the silken bags that moth caterpillars form around themselves prior to pupating. I see it as just a sloppy use of a word with a precise scientific meaning.

Eric Carle has been very open about admitting his mistake, although he does talk about an obscure butterfly that actually makes a cocoon. See http://www.eric-carle.com/q-cocoon.html for his response. To be fair, this book is a work of fiction. Caterpillars don’t really eat cherry pie or sausages either. That is part of what makes it so fun. So, go ahead and pick up a copy. You can read it as is, substitute chrysalis or substitute the word pupa if you don’t want to say chrysalis.

Caterpillar’s Wish by Mary Murphy is another colorful picture book about a caterpillar that turns into a butterfly. It is a delightful story about three friends. Bee and Ladybug can fly, but Caterpillar can’t. Caterpillar feels left out until he transforms into a butterfly.


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In depth: Once again the author has chosen to call the transitional stage a cocoon. In this case it may be because cocoon is a smaller word, more appropriate for toddlers? (Perhaps authors of children’s books should use the more generic word “pupa.” It is short, easy to say and always correct, regardless of which insect is the subject.)

Inch by Inch by Leo Lionni is an adorable tale of an inchworm that escapes from some hungry birds in a clever way. This book could also be useful as an introduction to measuring.


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Waiting for Wings by Lois Ehlert is bright, bold and beautifully done. It traces the life cycle of a butterfly very simply, and then has a bit more in depth information about butterflies and flowers at the end. There’s even a page of information about butterfly gardening.

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Ten Little Caterpillars
by Bill Martin Jr. and illustrated by Lois Ehlert

From Caterpillar to Butterfly by Deborah Heiligman, and illustrated by Bari Weissman, is an account of a classroom caterpillar that undergoes metamorphosis into a beautiful butterfly.

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Caterpillarology
by Michael Elsohn Ross is for children who are interested in science and doing science experiments. This book (and the others in the “-ology” series) are chock full of great information and fun activities. Whereas many children’s books repeat the same information over and over, these books are truly unique and interesting. “Chosen by Science Books and Films as one of the Best Books for Children.” Unfortunately, they are often out of print and may be hard to find.

See our growing list of children's books about moths and butterflies at Science Books for Kids.

Oh, I wish I had the time to take some video of one of our plants this morning. Our desert spoon is flowering and it is alive with bees. Honey bees, bumble bees, carpenter bees, digger bees, sweat bees, big bees, tiny bees, billions and billions of bees. Well, probably not that many, but it seemed that way. It was like a swarm.

The desert spoon plant sends up a huge flower stalk covered with blooms. This year there were 5 stalks. You can't see them all here.

desert spoon

Each stalk was covered with hundreds of bees. Each of those specks was a fast-moving insect.

bees
Of course you know that the bees were gathering pollen, the yellowish powder produced by the flower, and nectar, the sweet liquid reward for picking up the pollen. The honey bees pack the pollen into the specially shaped baskets on their hind legs. Check out the load this honey bee has gathered. Honey bees were the most numerous bees this morning.

honey bee

I was able to get very close to these insects without any danger. They were intent on gathering food, and that is it.

The biggest bees I saw were the black carpenter bees, but they seemed intimidated by the other bees and quickly flew away. They may have also been sizing up the stalks as future home sites. Carpenter bees build their nests in agave and desert spoon flower stalks.

The second biggest bees were yellow and black bumble bees. They stay near the top of the stalks, so I couldn’t get a close up.

bumble bee

The smallest bees were some tiny sweat bees. They were numerous, but not as noticeable because of their pencil-lead size.

sweat bee

Mixed in were a few other sweat bees and digger bees. Here are two examples.

green beeStripe bee

Finally, not all the creatures I saw this morning were working hard to gather pollen and nectar. This jumping spider was taking advantage of the bounty of bees to catch breakfast. It was behaving in an odd manner, jumping down and hanging upside down with its legs drawn in. In that position it looked all the world like a flying bee. Very Cool!!

spider

For more information about bees, check out the "Africanized Honey Bees on the Move" website under the blogroll in the sidebar.

Also, try out growing list of children's books about honey bees at Science Books for Kids.

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