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Upon revisiting the same plants again and again while searching for the bug of the week, I've made an interesting discovery. Although we think of insects as being highly mobile, a few do settle down for a period of time and make a plant their home. For example, the tarantula hawk from last week is still around. It seems to be a male and it has staked out one of our milkweed plants as his very own. We've started calling him our "pet" tarantula hawk wasp.

Going back to where I found the assassin bug earlier, I was surprised to find this adult assassin bug. The adult looks very different from the bright orange nymph. It is green with dark red on its wings. Would you have recognized it? I wonder if it the same one...

assassin bug adult

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What an odd-looking creature I found on my desert milkweed flower this week. It is bright orange with striped legs. Look at the black spines on back end (abdomen). It also seems to have its straw-like beak piercing a black insect.

This insect is a young assassin bug, a stage called a nymph. If it were an adult, it would have wings.

Assassin bugs use their front legs to capture other insects for food. They stick their proboscis or beak into their victim and suck out the juices. In this case the nymph has caught a tiny parasitic wasp. The wasp was probably searching for aphids, which is what its larvae use for food.

assassin bug nymph

Edit: I was able to find an adult to show in this later post.